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An Ignatian Education

Our patron, Ignatius Loyola, is a man who lived in the 16th century, and founded the Jesuit Order, that for the past 450 years has made education a primary platform in its mission throughout the world.  This Order of priests and brothers, with over 60,000 lay people, administer approximately 665 educational institutions throughout 78 countries in the world and Loyola Senior High School students are numbered among the 1,900,000 students who are the recipients of an Ignatian education.

Any education that is true to the spirit of Saint Ignatius Loyola is concerned, as it has been since the 16th century, with forming or shaping the whole person – mind, heart and hands.  Formation of the mind to think critically and reflectively; formation of the heart from which is to spring character, virtue, spiritual depth; and development of practical skills in whatever field of endeavour one pursues, are the trademarks of an Ignatian education.

Loyola, then, is not merely concerned with ‘getting a good HSC’, important as this is.  Education is a means to an end. It is not limited to short-term achievements. Its focus is the full development, the life-long development of the students entrusted to us. It is concerned very much with what type of person we will become. It is why what goes on beyond the classroom is also as important as what transpires within it. How we relate to others, how we cope with our circumstances, how we deal with our problems and even, from time to time, our tragedies are all important moments of caring, learning and growth.

  • Loyola Senior High School - A Jesuit School
    • Our Patron Saint

      St Ignatius

      Ignatius was born at Loyola in northern Spain in the year before Columbus' voyage to America.  He was raised as a hidalgo in the Age of Discovery at a time of Spain's greatness, living a full life with all the enthusiasm of a Basque. After a time as a courtier, he turned to a military career. At the age of twenty-nine, while convalescing from a wound received at the siege of Pamplona, he read the Gospels and the lives of the saints. There followed a burning desire to follow in the footsteps of Christ.

      Many spiritual experiences came Ignatius' way as he discerned where God was leading him. Returning to studies later in life, he gathered nine "first Companions" around him at the University of Paris.  They included Francis Xavier. They took vows together and the Society of Jesus grew, being ratified by the Pope in 1540.

      As first General of the Jesuits, Ignatius contributed greatly to the Catholic revival of the sixteenth century. Ignatius intended his society to be a mobile force whose members would go anywhere and undertake any work "for the greater glory of God". As the order grew, the work of Jesuits became more diversified - schoolmasters, preachers, scholars, missionaries and workers with the poor. In recent years two motion pictures, The Mission and Black Robe, have attempted to retell some of the missionary endeavours of the early followers of Ignatius.

      These followers were to be, in Ignatius' terms, large-hearted people who would want to do what Ignatius called "The magis", the "more", to work for the "greater good". His desire for a generous spirit is summed up in a prayer ascribed to him:

      Dearest Lord, teach me to be generous,
      Teach me to serve you as you deserve,
      To give and not to count the cost,
      To fight and not to heed the wounds,
      To toil and not to seek for rest,
      To labour and not ask reward,
      Save that of knowing that I do your holy will.

      St Ignatius
    • Jesuit Partner Schools in Australia
    • International Jesuit Network

      For more than 450 years, Jesuit education has had a profound effect on our world. Beginning with their first college in Messina, Sicily in 1548, Jesuits soon became known as the schoolmasters of Europe because of their highly regarded schools and their pre-eminence as scholars. Jesuits were at the centre of the intellectual world, beginning a long tradition of educating leaders in all walks of life.

      Today, Loyola Senior High School is a part of the International Jesuit Network of Educational institutions that spans over 70 countries in the world. Over 1,370 institutions educate in excess of 1.9 million students per year. As a member of this network, Loyola has access to, and shares in, a wealth of information across the globe. Some of our most significant links are as follows:

      Jesuit Links

      SOCIETY OF JESUS
      Connecting Jesuits and friends around the world
      www.sjweb.info

      JESUIT EDUCATION
      Finding Jesuit Educational institutions around the world
      www.sjweb.info/education

      JESUITS SOCIETY OF JESUS AUSTRALIA
      www.jesuit.org.au

      SOCIETY OF JESUS USA
      www.jesuit.org

    • Society of Jesus

      Loyola Senior High School has been named for St Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuit priests and brothers). Building at Loyola Senior High School appropriately commenced in 1991, the quincentenary of the birth of St Ignatius in 1491. The Diocese has entrusted the care of the school to the Society, who have a tradition of education spanning more than 450 years.

      Why do Jesuits teach?

      More than 400 years ago a Jesuit wrote, “institutio puerulis, renovatio mundi” – the education of youth is the renewal of the world.

      At Loyola Senior High School we believe this.

      Formation, not information, is the key to an Ignatian education. The ideal is to form the well-rounded person who is intellectually competent, technologically skilled, open to growth, religious, reflective, loving and committed to doing justice in generous service to the people of God. Students in a school with a Jesuit influence come to realise that their talents are gifts to be developed, not for self-satisfaction or for self-gain, but rather, with the help of God, for the good of the human community.

      Select Jesuit symbols and sayings

      IHS symbol

      An ancient abbreviation of the name of Jesus formed by taking the first three letters of Jesus’ name in Greek (IHSOYS), which was later adapted by the Jesuits (Society of Jesus) as a common logo.

      The three nails at the bottom represent the nails used to crucify Jesus.

      AMDG Logo

      ‘ad maiorem Dei gloriam’

      ‘For the greater glory of God’ – this is the motto of the Society of Jesus.

    • Ignatian Educational Philosophy

      Characteristics of Jesuit and Ignatian Education

      1. Jesuit and Ignatian education: is world-affirming; assists in the total formation of each individual within the human community; includes a religious dimension that permeates the entire education; is an apostolic instrument; promotes dialogue between faith and culture.

      2. Jesuit and Ignatian education: insists on individual care and concern for each person; emphasises activity on the part of the student; encourages life-long openness to growth.

      3. Jesuit and Ignatian education: is value-orientated; encourages a realistic knowledge, love and acceptance of self; provides a realistic knowledge of the world in which we live.

      4. Jesuit and Ignatian education:  proposes Christ as the model of human life; provides adequate pastoral care; celebrates faith in personal and community prayer, worship and service.

      5. Jesuit and Ignatian education: is preparation for active life commitment; serves the faith that does justice; seeks to form “men and women for others”; manifests a particular concern for the poor.

      6. Jesuit and Ignatian education: is an apostolic instrument, in service of the church as its serves human society; prepares students for active participation in the church and the local community for the service of others.

      7. Jesuit and Ignatian education: pursues excellence in its work of formation; witnesses to excellence.

      8. Jesuit and Ignatian education: stresses lay-Jesuit collaboration; relies on a spirit of community among: teaching staff and administrators; the Jesuit community; governing boards; parents; former students; benefactors. Takes place within a structure that promotes community.

      9. Jesuit and Ignatian education: adapts means and methods in order to achieve its purposes most effectively; is a “system” of schools with a common vision and common goals; assists in providing the professional training and ongoing formation that is needed, especially for teachers.

      Ignatian Ministry of Teaching

      Ministry Diagram

      Context

      Teachers are urged to take account of the real context of a student’s life that includes:

      • The socio-economic, political and cultural context
      • The institutional environment of the school or learning centre
      • Previously acquired concepts students bring with them to the start of the learning process.

      Experience

      Describes any activity in which in addition to a cognitive grasp of the matter being considered, some sensation of an effective nature is registered by the student. Human experience may be direct or vicarious.

      Reflection

      Reflection includes the memory, the understanding, the imagination and the feelings a student uses to capture the meaning and essential value of what is being studied, in order to discover its relationship with other aspects of knowledge and human activity and appreciated its implications. Reflection means thoughtful reconsideration of some subject matter, experience, idea, purpose or spontaneous reaction, in order to grasp its significance fully. Reflection is the process by which meaning surfaces in human experience.

      Action

      Action refers to internal human growth based upon experience reflected upon and its manifestations externally. It involves a process of interiorising choices and manifesting choices externally.

      Evaluation

      Evaluation is important not only in assessment of academic outcomes but of human growth.

  • Faith in Action at Loyola Senior High School
    • Spiritual Life

      Prayer and Liturgy

      The Loyola community is built upon the belief that Jesus is at the heart of our life and locale. We are committed to preparing our students for active participation in the local church community through the experience of creative and prayerful liturgies.

      Our liturgies are a sign that we are one body gathered together to celebrate the life that God is giving us in Jesus Christ. We reflect on the way that the Spirit of Jesus is speaking to us in the lives of our brothers and sisters and in the lives of those whom we often pray for - the ones who have not yet found a home in anyone’s heart.

      Our liturgical celebrations must engender a hospitable spirit in each person present and be a sign to anyone who comes into our midst that we are indeed a vibrant Christian community with much to give thanks for and much to celebrate.

      Liturgies are the responsibility of the Liturgy Co-ordinator and the Religious Education Co-ordinator working as a team. However, as many people as possible - students and staff - are called upon to participate in the preparation process and the liturgical presentation so that the celebration may truly be an action of the whole community. Liturgical celebrations are rich in art and music, the cultures and dances of the world, and embody both word and action.

      Loyola’s liturgies include celebrations of the following feasts and occasions:

      • Opening School Mass

        This is an opportunity to ask God’s blessing on our endeavours for the coming year and pray for our family, friends and our school community.

      • Ash Wednesday

        We gather to mark the beginning of the season of Lent; to reflect on our lives and our relationship with God and each other. The Church urges us to renew our hearts and prepare for the promise of eternal life that is proclaimed at Easter.

      • Holy Thursday

        During this celebration, we journey with Jesus on his way to the cross and ultimately, the joy of new life. We also induct the Student Representative Council, commissioning them to be servants to their community, in the same spirit as Jesus.

      • Feast of the Sacred Heart

        A very important feast in the Jesuit calendar, it is in this celebration that we reflect on the ‘things of the heart’. We are particularly mindful on this day of people in our community and throughout the world who are suffering some form of poverty or hardship. During our Mass the donations of money, food, clothing and blankets for the St Vincent de Paul Winter Appeal are offered to the Holy Family parish community at Emerton.

      • Feast of St Ignatius (Multicultural Day)

        This celebration is at the heart of our liturgical and cultural life at Loyola.

      • Valete

        Our Valete celebrations mark the culmination of thirteen years of schooling for our Year 12 students. Learn more about Valete Night.

      • Foundation Day Mass

        On December 3 each year the Loyola community gathers to celebrate our Foundation Day. This day has special significance to our community in different ways. December 3 is the Feast of the great Jesuit missionary and patron saint of Australia, St Francis Xavier SJ. It was for this reason that the Loyola Foundation Stone was laid in 1992. Finally, this day represents the culmination of the St Vincent de Paul Christmas Appeal, when we present our Christmas hampers to the Holy Family Parish Community.

      Weekly Masses

      An important part of life at Loyola is the regular celebration of the Eucharist. One of the Jesuit members of staff celebrates Mass with staff and students on a voluntary basis, either before school or during lunch time, usually about three times a week. Staff members and students are always welcome to participate in what is generally a very reflective and personal experience, a perfect way to either start the day or step back from a busy schedule!

      Retreats and Reflection Days

      At the core of Ignatian Spirituality is a belief that “everything happens between the head and the heart” and our emphasis on Spiritual Formation through the experience of retreats is born out of this belief. Saint Ignatius used a retreat structure when he created the guide to prayer that is followed by all of his companions. He called this guide The Spiritual Exercises.

      Loyola Senior High School offers the following retreat programs as an integral part of the spiritual formation of our students:

      Twilight Retreats

      All Year Eleven students participate in a twilight retreat early in the first term of their studies at Loyola. This experience encourages reflection on the decision to pursue senior studies and its impacts on the student, and familiarity with the story of Saint Ignatius and with some of his key teachings about the importance of service and ‘awareness’. These retreats are facilitated by a collaboration of staff and Year 12 Students.

      Year 12 Retreat

      All students participate in an overnight retreat early in Term 2 of their HSC year. The aim of this retreat is to provide students with the opportunity to pause to reflect on the direction of their lives, and on the future directions of their educational, relational and spiritual journey.

      Targeted Retreats

      On occasions throughout their time at Loyola some students are offered the opportunity to reflect on very specific issues in their faith and lives. These retreats are optional and are run by the school Chaplain in conjunction with the Pastoral Care Committee.

    • Faith Serving Others
      “Here am I among you, as one who serves.”   (Luke 22:27)

      In the Preliminary Year all students complete the Faith Serving Others program. One of the ideals of the school is to form women and men who show concern for others and who will venture into the community with a sense of commitment. 

      This is a key component of Jesuit and Ignatian philosophy.

      The Characteristics of Jesuit Education states:
      Jesuit education helps students to realise that talents are gifts to be developed, not for self satisfaction or self gain, but rather, with the help of God, for the good of the human community.

      To this end, a program has been devised which requires all Year 11 students to participate in twenty (20) hours of service over a period of up to three school terms. Each student is required to find his or her own placement and the voluntary work is done in the student’s own time. 

      Christ calls us all to ‘service’ and this involves using all aspects of our personality and talents and it involves challenges and risks. Much of what the students do in this program is unfamiliar and some parts of it they may find difficult. But we encourage them in the difficult times to remember that while stretching to reach out hurts, it is also a sure sign of life and growth.

      The school provides a reflection book, which is used by the student for commenting on each week’s experience. This is a critical part of the process as it is through reflection that our experiences gain meaning.

      Tutors regularly monitor students’ progress and report to the Faith Serving Others Co-ordinator.

    • Feast of St Ignatius

      The highlight of our liturgical year is the celebration of the Feast of Saint Ignatius SJ annually on the 31st of July. Saint Ignatius was passionate about spreading Christianity throughout the world. As a tribute to his success in this mission and the cultural diversity of our community, we celebrate Mass followed by a multicultural luncheon and concert. The entire day is organised by our staff, students and their families.

    • Pastoral Care

      Aims

      Loyola seeks to promote the balanced human development of all its students in the provision of a pastoral care program, which touches all aspects of school life. The program complements the:

      • The catholic philosophy of education, which sees itself educating with parents and other care-givers.

      • The Ignatian ideal of the education of the whole person – a person who masters various fields of study, who will seek to learn right from wrong, and who will be compassionate towards others, especially those who are more disadvantaged.

      • The Ignatian practice of reflection on action and the desire to choose the greater good (magis) in small and larger issues of life, leading to attitudinal growth.

      • The recognition that education is more than academic pursuit and that young people need the provision of time, space, guidance and relationship to enable them to make informed choices and reflect upon true values and worthy goals.

      Beliefs Concerning Pastoral Care at Loyola

      The pastoral care program at Loyola is based on the following beliefs:

      • Every individual has a unique dignity that is to be enhanced and encouraged.

      • We are a community of faith where Gospel values and the teachings of Christ are reflected in all that we do.

      • As a faith community, we show compassion expressed in forgiveness towards one another.

      • The total development of the individual students – spiritual, moral, emotional, intellectual, physical and social – needs nurturing.

      • The formation of quality relationships within and beyond the school is fundamental to Pastoral Care.

      • The school community is one which strives towards inclusion, not exclusion, except where an individuals best interests are not, nor can be, served and where repeated behaviour, contrary to the community’s values, is exhibited to the detriment of the individual and the community.

      • The provision of meaningful and satisfying learning experiences is imperative in the Pastoral Care Program, which aims to look at contemporary issues, extending beyond HSC subject materials.

      • The value of the individual, irrespective of ability, status, position or cultural background, is uppermost at all times.

      • Pastoral Care is ongoing and operates throughout the whole day, extended by each member of staff in his or her responsibilities.

      • Teachers, parents and other care-givers work together towards the growth and development of the senior student.

      Pastoral Care occurs both formally and informally at Loyola Senior High School, some examples of pastoral care in action at Loyola are: liturgies, faith serving others, multicultural day, reflection afternoons, retreats, counseling, career advice and support, chaplaincy, weekend tutorials and scheduled pastoral time in tutor groups each fortnight.

    • Social Justice

      The Social Justice Group has a long tradition at Loyola Senior High, providing many opportunities for students to put faith into action. The group is concerned with issues such as:

      • world poverty
      • human rights
      • fair trade
      • social injustices and
      • sustainable development.

      Each year the school promotes awareness and raises money for many organisations including:

      • Caritas Australia
      • St Vincent de Paul Society
      • Word Vision

      The Social Justice Group has an executive of four students from Years 11 and 12 respectively. Those students with an interest in a leadership role within the school may wish to consider this possibility.

      The Social Justice Group provides an excellent chance for students to be of service to others by working towards the transformation of our world into a just society.

    • St Vincent de Paul

      We need young people to “bring glad tidings to the poor” in our community.

      We seek out Year 11 & 12 students to join the Loyola Chapter.

      St Vincent de Paul Logo

      Our Events:

      • Winter Appeal
      • Winter Sleep Out and Concert
      • Adopt a family for Christmas

An Ignatian Education

  • Our patron, Ignatius Loyola, is a man who lived in the 16th century, and founded the Jesuit Order, that for the past 450 years has made education a primary platform in its mission throughout the world.  This Order of priests and brothers, with over 60,000 lay people, administer approximately 665 educational institutions throughout 78 countries in the world and Loyola Senior High School students are numbered among the 1,900,000 students who are the recipients of an Ignatian education.

    Any education that is true to the spirit of Saint Ignatius Loyola is concerned, as it has been since the 16th century, with forming or shaping the whole person – mind, heart and hands.  Formation of the mind to think critically and reflectively; formation of the heart from which is to spring character, virtue, spiritual depth; and development of practical skills in whatever field of endeavour one pursues, are the trademarks of an Ignatian education.

    Loyola, then, is not merely concerned with ‘getting a good HSC’, important as this is.  Education is a means to an end. It is not limited to short-term achievements. Its focus is the full development, the life-long development of the students entrusted to us. It is concerned very much with what type of person we will become. It is why what goes on beyond the classroom is also as important as what transpires within it. How we relate to others, how we cope with our circumstances, how we deal with our problems and even, from time to time, our tragedies are all important moments of caring, learning and growth.

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